Info Center

Shining Star August 2010

This program rewards individuals that go above and beyond their job responsibilities in exemplifying one of the five supporting commitments. These commitments are Safety, Clinical Excellence, Courtesy & Caring, Healing Environment and Efficiency.

HEALING ENVIRONMENT

AWARDED TO:  Michael Arcaro
RECOGNIZED BY:  Lyle Matthews

SITUATION/TASK:  I was in the atrium on the 3rd floor this afternoon when a patient on a gurney came off the elevator on his way to 3 South. A woman with several children was sitting outside 3 South and said, “Hey, there is Grandpa.” They all went running. The kids had made a couple signs telling grandpa they loved him, get well, etc. The transporter, Michael Arcaro, noticed the family coming. He saw what was happening and stopped the gurney; he used the foot petals to lower the gurney so the kids could see their grandpa and he could say hi to them. The patient was in good health visually and completely awake and coherent. After lowering the gurney, Michael stepped aside for a few moments so the kids could have their moment, which was irreplaceable. I could hear the patient’s excitement to see his family and those kids. A benefit to his health that no medication I will offer could provide. Michael then explained to the family that he should get grandpa back to his room so the nurse can get him settled.

I waited until Michael was done and was leaving 3 South and went up to introduce myself. I told him I saw what he did and how terrific it was. He recognized the situation, saw those kids coming, and reacted tremendously. The kids were beaming after seeing grandpa since they would probably not get to go into his room later on. There is no way to measure how important those moments can be. Great job by Michael working to improve the lives of our patients and families in any way possible.

EFFICIENCY

AWARDED TO:  Carolyn Carver
RECOGNIZED BY:    MJ Cooper

SITUATION/TASK: In PACU we use many forms that we buy from Standard Register. The cost of these forms makes up a significant part of our supply budget.

ACTION:  Carolyn noticed that the flossy folders we use to hold the after care instructions cost us $181 per carton. In the past we have found them lying in the bathroom, at patients bedsides and in the lobby. She bought the cost to my attention and we decided to stop using them and instead give out the instructions with the EMC card attached. This month she found that the cost of our physical examination forms dropped from over $50 per pack to $6.76 per pack if we removed the thin red band from the bottom of the form.

RESULT:  Carolyn is always aware of costs and makes excellent suggestions for simple changes that that have a significant impact on my budget over the year.

COURTESY/CARING

AWARDED TO:  Kay Flemming
RECOGNIZED BY:  Tijuana Parker

SITUATION/TASK: After hours, a Spanish family had multiple questions about tuberculosis. The family was having difficulty reading instructions. Kay stopped her dinner and came back to the hospital from home to explain precautions to the patient. She spent over an hour with the family.  She explained precautions and made sure the discharge was safe for the patient and the family.

ACTION:  Family was so thankful and verbalized how wonderful the explanation was. The felt they were able to ask questions and felt comfortable taking the patient home without worrying.

RESULT:   The result was decreasing the risk for a possible spread of TB, decreasing the anxiety of the family and the patient and decreased anxiety of the staff to have her support. Kay came and hugged me and really made me feel good for calling her. Excellent job.

CLINICAL EXCELLENCE

AWARDED TO:  Stephanie Jones
RECOGNIZED BY:  David Peel

SITUATION/TASK:  ‘Conditions of Admission, Informed consent, Risks and Benefits.’ Terms that hospital staff use every day. What happens when the risk of ‘Risks and Benefits’ shows its ugly face.

Stephanie Jones RN was assigned a patient from the cardiac catheterization lab. The patient had just undergone a very new specialized procedure performed only here at Eisenhower. Stephanie received the patient to his room and set about connecting equipment and monitoring the patient’s vital signs. Within minutes Stephanie realized something was very wrong with her patient.

ACTION:  Utilizing skills only learned from experience Stephanie repositioned the patient provided high flow IV fluids and emergent medications along with directly contacting the attending cardiologist via her spectra-link phone. Within minutes the cardiologist was at the bedside. An emergent invasive procedure that is normally only seen in the ICU was performed.

RESULT:  The result was a life threatening risk was overcome and the patient had a positive outcome. Stephanie’s excellent assessment and nursing skills prevented a ‘Code Blue’ situation. The patient went home a few days later. Great job Stephanie.

SAFETY

AWARDED TO:  Catherine Alwani
RECOGNIZED BY:  Richard Nelson and Sheila Middleton

SITUATION/TASK:  Creating therapeutic substitutions increases patient safety. Yesterday we created a negative example – a therapeutic substitution was not performed resulting in a potentially significant medication error. Medication was simply ordered “75/25” and was manually entered in the computer as non-formulary “Insulin Lisp/Lisp Prot (Hum).” The order did not state “Do not substitute.”

You can only guess what happened – the label was attached to a vial of Humalog and sent to the floor and a dose of 30 units was attempted to be given at 20:02 last night.

ACTION:  Fortunately for unknown reasons, the dose was not given. Had the dose been given, the dose of Humalog could have resulted in profound and potentially fatal hypoglycemia. The RN (Catherine) caught the error and brought the vial back to the Pharmacy. This morning, Catherine called the prescriber who changed “75/125” to “NPH/Regular 70/30.” Many thanks to Catherine.