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Leon A. Feldman, MD

DRAWN TO LIFE’S DETAILS

Dr. Feldman and Rancy, a registered, dietition, have engaged their sons in their love of tennis.
Dr. Feldman and Rancy, a registered, dietition, have engaged their sons in their love of tennis.
As a cardiologist who initially studied psychology, Leon A. Feldman, MD, has always had an interest in both the mind and the heart. Cardiology Section Chief at Eisenhower Medical Center, where he has been on staff since 1998, Dr. Feldman is Board Certified in both cardiology and his sub-specialty electrophysiology, which focuses on the heart’s rhythms. [PHOTO dir="assets/news/story/pg30.jpg" align="left" caption="Dr. Feldman and Rancy, a registered dietitian, have engaged their sons in their love of tennis" width="300"]

As an undergraduate at Cornell University, Dr. Feldman wanted to be a psychiatrist, but once he was in medical school at Tufts University in Boston, he fell in love with cardiology. Dr. Feldman says he was excited by the challenge, and liked that he could make an immediate impact on a patient’s life. He is still interested in psychology, however, and finds it valuable to his cardiology practice.

“The tenets you learn in psychology apply to all aspects of medicine,” says Dr. Feldman. “In cardiology, you have to help patients deal with their fears, so being able to counsel them both physically and mentally is very important.” Feldman was drawn to the sub-specialty of electrophysiology because of the role it plays in detecting cardiovascular problems, as well as the opportunity it gives him to apply both his surgical skills and his intellectual interest in studying the heart’s electrical system.

Dr. Feldman joined the staff at Eisenhower immediately after completing a fellowship at Oregon Health & Science University. “I was intrigued by the Palm Springs area, and excited about the professional opportunities at Eisenhower,” he says. “The patient population is sophisticated and most appreciative of the care I provide. As a sub-specialist in heart rhythm disorders, I have been most grateful to Eisenhower for its unwavering support of the Electrophysiology Laboratory. I am able to provide comprehensive, state-of-the-art care here.”

“You have to go beyond what you can see, and have intuition that tells you what you should be looking for. Being extremely attuned to the person in front of you is crucial—whether you are taking a photograph or conducting an examination.”
—Leon A. Feldman, MD

Feldman confesses that initially it was a challenge to adapt to the desert climate, but now he cannot think of any place he would rather live. “The beauty of this area, particularly in the winter, is amazing. The clear air makes everything appear grander, the colors more intense. Now, when we travel to other places, we feel like someone has turned the lights off.”

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Dr. Feldman’s love of travel has provided him with ample landscapes to perfect his skills in photography.

Dr. Feldman’s strong visual sense expresses itself in his personal hobby, photography. His first camera was a gift from his father when he was eight, and he took photography courses in college. He focuses principally on portraiture, with his wife Rancy and their three young sons his favorite subjects. Dr. Feldman sees many links between his interest in photography and his work as a cardiologist. “Both require you to pick up on the very fine details of what you are looking at,” he explains. “You have to go beyond what you can see, and have intuition that tells you what you should be looking for. Being extremely attuned to the person in front of you is crucial—whether you are taking a photograph or conducting an examination.”

Dr. Feldman and Rancy, a registered dietitian, have engaged their sons in their love of tennis and travel. The whole family is planning a trip to Costa Rica…and Dr. Feldman will be taking both his camera and his tennis racket!

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